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and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan -- one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not cou
and health care reform was done. when we look at deficit reduction, it's four or five deals, each one in endless, horrible slog through the d.c. marshes. in the second term the two things we are going to see, it does not look like we are going to see much more on jobs. the white house is not fighting hard. they have not made infrastructure a condition of moving forward. we got $600 billion in the fiscal cliff. republicans are going to make a decision to include revenues or whether or not they are going to make a decision that is better to do no more reduction over the second term. if it is what it takes to keep the president from getting more tax revenues. >> let me ask this. what i hear you saying is deficit reduction. it seems as though we have a president who is legitimately a deficit hawk. he believes the deficit is a problem and deficit reduction is a priority. when you look at the approval rate of americans on handling of the economy, it's split half and half with support for the president and 49% versus 48% disapproving. there's a little room to do a big thing. this president i
to the president about past conflicts over the deficit reduction. mark and i were talking about how far back we go. it is a few years. and i remembered him of the earlier sessions that we had. gramm-rudman one and two and gran member holland. i've googled it for all of them. and i was thinking there have been two major changes. number one is the dataset that is clearly much greater. the deficit is much greater. when i think of the ways and means committee, would change their has been in the composition. the ranking member at a time when i started went to the world bank. i worked with bill on trade. he was handling the tax material mainly. and bill was working on health care at the time. i think a second major change is very much effective today and affects us today. it is this change in composition of the republican party. i think it has moved very much more to the right. i think that makes it very difficult to handle the problems that we have before us. let me comment briefly on where we are. you offer the president yesterday. we have had spending cuts of a trillion and a half dollars. it comes f
night at 8 on c-span's "q&a." >> next, a discussion on the debt ceiling and deficit reduction debate. this was part of a brookings institution forum on jobs and the economy. this panel is an hour or and 20 minutes -- an hour and 20 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> all right. should we get started again? um, i'm either using that vision, or that clock is way off. but i'll use my watch. okay. so if everybody could come in from coffee and sit down, we'll get started on our second panel. and we're delighted to welcome a really terrific set of panelists, lew kaden, vice chair of citi, maya macguineas who is now involved in or leading the fix the debt campaign. bob mcdonald who is the ceo and president of procter & gamble, and ralph schlosstein who's the ceo of ever corp.. so really a terrific group. let me just give a little bit of context, at least while everyone's filing into the room. i'm martin baily with the economic studies program at brookings. if we cast our minds back to the 1960s, the 1960s, obviously b, was a troubled decade politically, but economically growth was pretty
. >> thank you for your time. >> what will the president tell the country on monday about debt and deficit spending and how we get that under control, ben? >> well, i think that the president will follow precedent when it comes to the inaugural address and lay out a broader vision for are where we take the country in the next four years and to talk about how some of our founding principles and values can drive us through the challenges we continue to face. i think the state of the union address will be more of the agenda, more discussion of how we get it done with congress and enlisting the is support of the american public. >> so nothing on monday about spending then? >> well, i can't specifically say that the remarks aren't totally finalized yet. i think what you will see is the broader vision. the specific agenda will come in the days ahead. there was a statement out of the white house on friday addressing the proposal that the republicans have put on the table right now. it looks like they may be breaking the ice a little bit and not holding the nation's full faith and credit hostage f
they have to really assert a move toward deficit reduction? >> you know, in my mind they actually missed the best chance they had, which was the expiration of the bush tax cuts, which was really the best chance for both sides. if there was ever a point where a grand bargain was possible, it would have been i think the republicans accepting rolling back more of that tax cut than we did in return for acquiring democrats to deal with the very real long-term challenge of entitlements. we did not take advantage of that. we had a minimalist deal that confirms 82% of bush tax cuts, possibly the worst possible outcome and no spending cuts, probably the worst possible outcome in the long term from a deficit perspective. now i think the history is this is not a powerful mechanism. in the end it's a doomsday device you cannot use. you go back to the midninety with bill clinton and the republican congress, look at 2011. i think in the end they will decide they cannot use this measure and they seem to be heading that way this week in their house republican retreat. >> ian bremer is with us. he's the
industry and manufacturing. the second on deficit reform, and the third on improving government performance. the participants here today include brookings scholars, outside experts, and private sector representatives and leaders. our discussions will reflect a lot of the research that goes on here at brookings, and you will be able to find a number of examples of that research outside the auditorium where you came in. my recommended particular, the work of our metropolitan program on ideas on how to revitalize manufacturing, and also the work of art government studies program on how to make innovation-based economy. the growth through innovation project is an example of what we're doing increasingly here at brookings, and that is undertaking both research and public events and outreach that draw from multiple programs of research pro-guns here at the institution. and we have three of our research programs represented here today. the growth through innovation project is led inside a brookings by darrell west of our government studies program, bruce katz, of our metropolitan program of our ec
capacity coming out of the crisis. it is a credit deficit in the community and some regional bank that again is a serious public policy to address the next couple of years. >> thank you. my, what teacher perspective on the short run and long-run, so let's start on the short run because we are right in the middle. we sort of avoided the fiscal cliff. sad events involving over the next couple and how are these going to play out? >> if anyone you think should be played out, i'd be thrilled to know the answer because it's one of the more confusing moments. then they start by saying it's moment which do think there's an awful lot of good news in that news. the conference is focusing on the overall economic picture in the pieces that go into feeling economic growth and innovation. there's so much goodness to be had, so many ideas in a think tank where so many developed about luck and hope that growth in our country cynic at decision to use those that have a positive outcome. if one, the whole fiscal issue as i could coming up the wheels of everything else. right now there's basically no
of the government, about the size of the deficit, and a lot of back and forth over these three issues. i think i just want, without going into all the different ramifications, i want to say one word about the debt ceiling, which is that not everybody understand what the debt ceiling is about. the debt ceiling, raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits. it doesn't create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family, which is trying to improve its credit rating sank i know how we can save money, we won't pay off credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. it was the very slow solution to the debt ceiling in august 2011 i got the u.s. downgraded last time. so it's very, very important that all these issues are important but it's very, very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where our government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much
and deficits. less than two hours, the house will vote on a sandy relief bill that could deliver $51 billion in aid. but earlier today house republicans tried and failed to pass an amendment to the sandy relief bill that would give the money only if it were offset with spending cuts. they were saying no relief aid unless programs are cut back. 157 republicans voted for these offsets. they supported the amendment which would have killed the $50 million sandy relief package. how on earth did we get here? this is money sitting in washington to help our fellow americans get their lives back together. how can we explain the efforts to not help people? joining me now, congressman mick melvani. congressman, first of all, thanks for being here again. >> it's always a pleasure. thanks very much for having me. >> now, how can you talk about spending when americans are so desperate for help, congressman? >> well, it's pretty simple. because in your introduction you said the money was just sitting here in washington. and it's not. it's actually sitting in china. and we're going to have to go and borrow
are treated like anyone else under the law. >> debt and deficit front and center he offered a vigorous defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of healthcare and size of the deficit. we reject that they must choose between caring that built the country. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started his day early, with a prayer service at st. john's church. before departing the white house for the longest motorcades known to man for the rise to the capital. a star-studded affair. where else do you see paul ryan mingling with jay-z and beyonce who belted out the national anthem. >> the ceremony was over there was a stream of pomp and circumstance waiting. >> from signing papers to officially nominate the new cabinet to lunch with congressional leaders. then, of course, the parade. the first family could make the way back to the white house in that grand bulletproof review stand. yet all of that could wait because leaving the west front of the capitol, the president went off script to take in the vista of the national mall. mr. obama seemed to be
option. this is the congressman. >> the public option would decrease the deficit 104 billion over 10 years . >> and not everyone agrees that government health insurance would save money. republican critics say it is too costly and could bankrupt the country so who is right. >> i am dave asbin. welcome to forbes on fox. it is elizabeth mcdonald and rick unger and morgan bren an . we just can't afford a full-blown national health care system. >> no, we can't. every country that tried the health care system experienced higher cost or less health care. with obama care, it is a back door in a single payer system. of course, it costs more. >> mark tage. this is what he has plan obama care is not a single payer plan which is national health care. is that what it is turning into? >> i think it is going to have to be a single payer plan. will this reduce the deficit, no. is your goal here to provide health care to people? >> the private sector has not done a good job of >> it is going two or three times the rate of inflation . >> but you are saying that a government take over of health care w
start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congress. and this is not something that the president can do alone. it is the congress decides how big the deficit will be but the president has to work with congress. we need more revenue and we need to drive down spending. i think the president understands that and he is working on this but he cannot do this alone. >> looking forward to the next four years, do you see an america that is retreating? >> i see an american -- a
. . it is not broke. our priorities are broken. there is a misplaced obsession with debt and deficits as the national emergency of our time. that has driven the story line inside the beltway. we did a story on how the austerity cost rules washington. it is a portrait of think tanks, philanthropists and others who have framed in a way so it is hard to tell an alternative story. that has shifted a little because of new voices and forces emerging from the 99% or what ever you want to call it. >> you had better have twitter and facebook involved in the project. >> we do, absolutely. we have all kinds of new media. i agree you need to use all of that. it has been a very powerful force. we use all of that at "the nation. " we have a correspondent right about this in a politically. at occupy wall street in new york a few miles from our office, one thing that struck our correspondent was how many young people came to the square and were caught up in conversations, talking to people and the general assembly's, conversations. so many people have lived in front of their laptop or been part of the new media that
, they are still negotiating. there's still trapped in negotiating cuts in the long- term deficit. -- they're still trying to negotiate cuts in the long term deficit. >> the republicans have been criticizeded for discussing financing, spending we have already done. that is not really true. the debt we have pays for the money that has already spent. increasing the debt cling thisould tie how much money we're going to spend. it would takee away a big talking point of the president and force -- how mumuch more debt do we want toto take on? what doeshat mean innerms of the entitlements? itas shifted in terms of the debabate. i do see what they are up to. >> democratats have said, no strings attached. the president said, no negotiations. per has writn about the fact th we are playing w with credit dowowngrade in any way. yohave to tackle the speing cucuts. you talk a lot to business leaders who say, the worstt of all possible worlds is the uncertainty. even t republican n plan to push this back does not get at th heart of w what -- businesses say we just need to know. >> the notion that you would play
back on the table. congresswoman january schawowsky and the deficit reduction act. the bill would offer the choice of the publically run health insurance plan. and get this, it would save a hundred billion dollars over the next ten years. this bill is a win for everybody. it will reduce the deficit. obama care has brought the number of uninsured americans to the lowest level since 2008. however, the law would be fully implemented until 2014. it would put pressure on all insurers to lower their premiums in order to compete. it would also provide immediate relief to small businesses and the federal government and all parts of the economy. for example, former defense secretary robert gates has warned the rising -- he has warned of rising military costs for years. >> sharply rising health care costs are consuming an ever-larger share of this department. growing from 19 billion 234 in . >> military health care costs have gone up 300% in the past decade. 2012 was the first year since 1995 military personnel saw an increase in health care premiums. now, there are two things republicans love. t
the narrow lens of deficit reduction so the larger goal of economic growth and maintaining the health and economic security of all americans. now, there's no question that reducing the federal deficit is a worthwhile goal. nobody's going to argue with that. we need to address our nation's long term physical problem. we understand that. they affect all of us. most importantly our children and our grandchildren. their future would not be bright if they are drowning in red ink of budget deficits and soaring national debt. we understand that too. however, their futures will not be very bright if they can't afford health care or if they can't afford a quality education or if they don't have the opportunity to attain long term financial security. leaving them with less economic security by weakening social security and medicare would be just as bad, and for many people, it would be worse, and if we weaken social security and medicare to the point of their parents and grandparents to no longer live with dignity and purpose, we will be risking their futures as well. as a nation, we have to br
. we do have a structural budget deficit in the city. we need to deal with the short- term balancing of the budget in a way that does not decimate basic city services that people rely on but also to address our long term structural budget deficit. that means implementing budget reforms that will smooth out the budget process so that it is not a boom-bust process. that means reforming our pension and retiree system so that they are stable and do not drain the general fund. that is a big aspect of it. another huge issue is the deferred maintenance on our infrastructure. we have a lot of infrastructure that has been deteriorating because we have not maintained properly. that includes roads, sewer systems, muni. we need to be much more diligent about maintaining our infrastructure. some of the big citywide issues that impact the district include transportation. we had more muni service and some other districts. it is not always reliable. some of the major bus lines in the district are not reliable. we have major projects like the renovation of delores park. it is an opportunity to define
unemployment continue to be a major factor. and when you look at the trade deficit we have, which peter morici more than anybody has tracked, we, we have issues dealing with our economy. we aren't dealing with. spending should be --. melissa: absolutely are. >> don't go putting us in the tank here. melissa: what is the best outcome for the economy with the debt limit debate? >> we certainly have, the dennis is right they have to raise the limit right now. however, i think that linking the next extension with passing a budget is a good thing because after all, how much you raise the limit is going to be a function of how much you intend to spend more than you take in. and so, we do at some point have to get to disciplining spending and linking it to how much additional we borrow. i think that is a reasonable thing to do. so i like the strategy of, you know, may 1th. -- 19th. that said, we really can't reduce the deficit a lot unless we do something about our budget deficit. you see, the trade deficit. the trade deficit detracts from demand. the budget deficit adds to demand. if you're going to
of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a second trip -- and a secretary. they do not think it is smart to protect and as corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild roads and schools or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way where everyone pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that is what i want as well. that is what i have proposed. we can get it done, but we're going to have to make sure people are looking at this irresponsible way, rather than just
if it is called, then it has to face the economic tasked with value facing 20% and a huge fiscal deficit thanks to the patronage of the last year than you are going to start to see a lot of the chickens come home to roost and see it break apart. this is very similar after -- basically he was forced to engage in a austerity package around 1952 until 55 and that is what basically got him kicked out. and then of course after 1944 he died and you begin to see that internal battle, then you begin to see diffraction happening but not until -- >> that is a perfect segue because i want to bring it back to russell for the question. we talked about politics and about constitution, institutions. we talked about the economy although we've alluded to this aspect to it let me ask you to take off your journalist hat and put on your markets have and ask a simple question is venezuela going to buy, sell or hold? >> i think what we are going to see in the short term is a great deal of turmoil to reverse of markets -- capital flees some certainty. so, right now you have on uncertainty because nobody knows what's
seriously with having a mess about deficit reduction, he knows you cannot begin to to deficit reduction until you take a serious approach to welfare reform. on the side of the house we're doing it in a fair and responsible way. a way that rewards hard work. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm sure the whole house will wish to join me in paying tribute to richard reginald walker, 28 engine regiment, attached to 21 engineer regiment. it is clear to see from the tributes paid that he was outstanding soldier and mutual respect. are deep assemblies are are with his family and his friends at this difficult time. mr. speaker, i would also like to mention helicopter crash in central london display but also central london display but also wish to join in sending our thanks to the emergency services for the rapid and professional response to the situation. mr. speaker, this point i had meetings with ministerial and colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the south i will have further such meetings later today. >> for
our trajectory of our budget deficit is going to be. certainly, the budget is not simply a numbers issue. it has a big impact when you translate it into the lives of our residents. when you are talking about deficits that may impact the morning commute because you write muni -- you ride muni, or whether we're talking about closing down seven facilities, or whether we're talking about impacts to services, there is an impact to residents, so i think that impact of the budget is big, as well as economic growth for our residents. >> what are the biggest issues for your district? supervisor chu: sunset district is a great district. it has many residents who are families. we have a lot of families in our district. lots of kids, lots of seniors, people who have raised their families there for many generations, and one of the paramount thing is, aside from the larger issues that are important to the entire city -- i think the big issue that is really in people's minds is the state of the economy. how is it that we are going to be able to bring down the unemployment rate in san francisco? h
to tax and spend to the congress, and the congress alone. our current deficit is the result of money congress has already borrowed. president obama explained to the american people today how republicans in congress are trying to avoid doing their actual jobs. >> these are bills that have already been racked up. and we need to pay them. so while i'm willing to compromise and find common ground over how to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they've already racked up. >> if the american people do not catch on to the severity of all of this, of defaulting on our debts, the country will be in a dire situation. president obama knows this. he believes it. he has proved it before. and he is not going to play games with economic stability. >> so we've got to pay our bills. and republicans in congress have two choices here. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills, or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not c
you the deficit. but the actual debt payment, are less than 90 cents on the dollar that we take in. so even if the president as he should should pays our debts, that leaves him with 90 cents on every dollar that comes in to fund the other priorities of government and he wants to threaten not to pay that debt service. i think that's irresponsible of the president to be suggesting default on the debt. we ought to be talking about a bipartisan solution to the spending problem that got us here in the first place. >> i have heard talk in the republican conference about a one or two or three month extension on the debt ceiling. and on a continuing resolution for the budget to run the government. is that one to three month solution not still on the table? >> well, larry, we're proposing a number of different solution, both short term and long term. frankly, president obama needs to start rolling up his sleeves and focusing on both instead of sitting over in the white house and kind of throwing out all the threats to everybody across the country and running around campaigning as if he's still
's not a quote median-term deficit reduction plan put in place. what will it take to get a deal? we start with dan gross. his latest piece is titled "obama brinksmanship puts gop in tough spot on debt ceiling." so dan, you write that while you fall off a cliff, you only bump your head in to a ceiling but economically the ceiling has the capacity to deliver far more damage. you are talking like my friend steve kornacki here. what is failing to raise the debt ceiling? why is that going to be catastrophic? >> well, you know, first of all the stock and bond markets will really go haywire in a way they didn't when we were about to go over the fiscal cliff because government bonds are held by everybody. chinese central bank, japanese central bank, every single bank financial institution out there. so if there's any question over the value of those and they start to decline, these institutions have a great amount of leverage and interconnected with everything else and sort of see what happened in 2008. it's also this issue of, you know, who gets paid? if you start to have to say maybe soldiers g
, spencer michels asks california governor jerry brown if his fiscal turnaround-- from a $27 billion deficit to a balanced budget-- offers a lesson for the nation. . >> you have to make tough choices. you have to live within your means. that means you have to not do everything you want to but you also have to raise more money. >> woodruff: and ray suarez examines a surge in suicides by u.s. troops last year, far exceeding the number killed in combat in afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of landscapes and river you see differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasur. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> a with thengog suport these instituti
deficits, but he signalled split decisions in an era of divided government. >> progress does not compel us to settle. centuries long debates about the role of government for all time, but it does require us to act in our time. [applause] >> for now decisions are upon us. and we cannot afford to wait. we cannot mistake absolutism for principle or substitute spectacle for politics or treat name calling as reasoned debate. [applause] >> we must act. we must act knowing that our work will be unperfect. we must act knowing that today's victories will be only partial. peter: top republicans issued bipartisan statements in the spirit of the day, but mitch mcconnell, the senate republican leader called federal spending and the debt the transcendent challenge of the great challenges of our day. david: was it president harrison who had a two hour speech at his inauguration that he caught pneumonia. this was one of the quickest speeches i have ever seen before. but bottom line here, the president, a lot of people say it sounded more like an acceptance speech at a convention than it did at an inaugura
reducing the cost of health care, the size of the deficit. the focus, it seemed to me, if there was an overriding theme, it was on equality, including fixing income inequality. how did you see it? >> i mean, the section on deficits, health care, entitlements, was a really fascinating paragraph. it wasn't a very long piece of the speech, but it was on one hand, the pragmatist obama coming out and saying we have to make hard choices on health care, on deficits, but he pivoted hard back to that message of equality that social security, medicare, medicaid are social equalizer and he's going to defend their place in society, and that's a slightly -- he's always said similar things, but the fact that he turned so hard back to a tone of saying i'm going to defend these programs, it led people to believe rightly so that he's going to be coming at the negotiations in the next couple months, maybe even the next four years, driving a harder bargain than he had the last four years on entitlement reform. it upset some deficit hawks, people who are hoping he really takes the reins o
years and, ironically, the whole fiasco actually added to the deficit. >> republicans basically had no choice but to retreat from their hard line position, negotiating with the american people. if the country defaulted, they would be responsible for a global economic collapse. the new plan for a three-month increase guarantees another debate in the next few months. okay, let's have it. it also shows republicans never had any intention on carrying out their threats. get your cell phones out. want to know what you think tonight. tonight's question, do republicans finally realize the consequences of holding the economy hostage? text a for yes. text b for no to 26239. debbie waserman schultz of florida, chairwoman of the dnc. good to have you with us tonight. >> thanks, ed. good to be here. >> is this a big victory of sorts or is this a trap as some democrats have labeled it? >> it's a little bit of both, because while it is good to hear that the republicans are recognizing that we cannot play chicken with our economy, that we cannot jeopardize the full faith and credit of the united st
to get our debt, the gdp, our deficit to gdp, down around 3%, which is the basis of which all economists left, right, center, agree, are the areas which we really can begin to grow as a country. and also my grandfather used to say, with the grace of god and good will of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a more urgent and immediate call, and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics very well so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i might add, oui an incredible debt of gratitude to many of you at the head table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have absolutely unanimity in this ballroom, nor do we in anyway ballroom, but we all know, everyone
friend, and i am glad his dog made it through so he could be here. he is a deficit hawk. more important than that he is a thoughtful and conscious -- voice of a conscious for the senate throughout his term on fiscal responsibility. we worked together in a very effective way to try to bring some sort of bipartisan effort into the requirement that we do something about the debt. it was really, as was mentioned, an idea that we came up with on a long plane ride i think to central america to put together a commission that then threw into the simpson bowls proposal that has become the defining memo for the effort to try to get that is under control. bob zoellick is fond of quoting a friend of his, the foreign minister of australia. we met a few months ago who said to him the united states is one debt deal away from leading the world out of fiscal chaos and disruption. we are. we truly are. we are a nation on the brink of massive economic expansion. from the place that can't is from, north dakota, you see the change in the paradigm on energy. we will go from an important country to exporting.
set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and septemberer all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they allr today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have you nan hit in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do some
and debt payments from lower deficits, as a spending cut. that's a dubious claim. number three, obama is counting a nearly 1 trillion dollar savings from more money than nobody expected to be spent anyway, now that the war in iraq is over and the afghanistan war is winding down. so, obama's entire premise that we need a balanced approach to cutting the deficit is based on a huge fiction which is that obama's plan will cut 4 trillion during the the next decade. it will do no such thing. he's basing on a falsity, just like day one when he's been in office, distort and pr propgandize. now, republicans need to understand all of this dealing with obama. they're dealing with a man who is reckless, ruthless as any president they will ever encounter and my next guest says he has a plan that mr. bolster the republicans hand when it comes to dealing with the democrats on the issue of debt and much more. ohio senator rob portman is here. and what do you make of obama, only 2006 a vote against the debt ceiling. >> it went further than that. he said it would be unpatriotic. >> sean: that's another
proclaimed his state's huge budget deficit had disappeared. but some politicians in the golden state are skeptical. newshour correspondent spencer michels sat down with brown in san francisco. his report is a co-production with our colleagues at kqed-san francisco, and begins with some background on the fiscal troubles and the budget fix. >> reporter: california's sorry financial state and cuts made to health and welfare programs have prompted nearly nonstop demonstrations at the state capital in recent times. those protests got going four years ago when california and its then governor republican arnold schwarzenegger faced a staggering budget deficit of $42 billion. the recession, built-in spending, a large population in need of state services like health and welfare, a limit on property taxes, plus republican legislators' refusal to raise taxes created a dilemma in the world's ninth largest economy. with budget cuts coming like clock work, the state's college and university systems declined in offerings and in reputation. schools suffered cutbacks in personnel and programs. servic
the deficit and immigration and gun safety and i don't think he's going to be very frustrated if washington is completely divorced from the reality in the country so he's going to seek common ground. he's going to find every way to compromise but he's going to be pretty clear and we're also going to bring the american people more into the debate than the first term. >> what's the big difference in the president obama that took the oath four years ago and tomorrow. >> there's atmospheric differences. we had an economy collapsing all around us and he was a first term president and still putting together his team and agenda and cabinet and still the economy is too weak but recovering and the question is right now building on that as opposed to simply trying to stem the bleeding. big difference and i think the experience of the office as you know. you know, that helps a lot and so i think he does have even more sure-footedness in his approach. >> it can become a bit of a burden. historians write about the second term curse and i know you and your team spent a lot of time studying how to avoid t
years ago. four years ago we had a 500 million dollar budget deficit, that would affect services for people all over san francisco; we would have to pay more for services and have services cut; where we needed it most. i felt the first year as chair of the budget committee, i learned so much about my abilities and how to make difficult stands on issues, and how to have working relationships with people going forward. i work closely with the mayor's office and with organizations across the city. in spite of difficult choices i feel i made the right choices; i always voted with my conscience and i'm proud of that. i'm excited to see the changes happening in district 11. four years ago we were really shaken hard by the high level of violence and homicides in our district. what was great to see in district 11 were places where there was a focus of some of the violence; neighbors came together and made the neighborhood stronger, particularly around athens street, you have a beautiful community garden there, at athens and avalon that will be dedicated in a couple of weeks no
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